Monday, September 1, 2014
insomniacshead:


"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.
Gary Lane

I gotta see this in person

insomniacshead:

"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.

Gary Lane

I gotta see this in person

(Source: vvolare)

silenceofthevoid:

thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

I’m in complete awe.

Sunday, August 31, 2014

(Source: only----gifs)

para-daze:

CAN I HAVE THIS BABY

para-daze:

CAN I HAVE THIS BABY

(Source: ohmyhay)

merchantshipss:

amutualddiction:

Counterparts // The Disconnect (x)

Brendan looks so much different now

merchantshipss:

amutualddiction:

Counterparts // The Disconnect (x)

Brendan looks so much different now

astrodidact:

Only a sheet of ice protects you from falling 1000 feet down this Abyss
Photographer Aaron Huey, who is on assignment for National Geographic, recently shared a picture of a frighteningly deep hole on the Lower Ruth Glacier. The only thing stopping people from plummeting down the 1000 feet drop into the ground is a sheet of ice. One crack, though.
Huey wrote:
Staring down what could be a 1,000ft deep worm hole through the blue ice of the Lower #RuthGlacier. I was never afraid of the ones full of water, they’d just be cold, but some had no water and it was easy to imagine a long slide to an icy death. #yikes (on assignment for @natgeo in #DenaliNationalPark)
http://sploid.gizmodo.com/only-a-sheet-of-ice-protects-you-from-falling-a-1000-fe-1614438185/all

astrodidact:

Only a sheet of ice protects you from falling 1000 feet down this Abyss

Photographer Aaron Huey, who is on assignment for National Geographic, recently shared a picture of a frighteningly deep hole on the Lower Ruth Glacier. The only thing stopping people from plummeting down the 1000 feet drop into the ground is a sheet of ice. One crack, though.

Huey wrote:

Staring down what could be a 1,000ft deep worm hole through the blue ice of the Lower #RuthGlacier. I was never afraid of the ones full of water, they’d just be cold, but some had no water and it was easy to imagine a long slide to an icy death. #yikes (on assignment for @natgeo in #DenaliNationalPark)

http://sploid.gizmodo.com/only-a-sheet-of-ice-protects-you-from-falling-a-1000-fe-1614438185/all
chasingh0sts:

The Current Will Carry Us

chasingh0sts:

The Current Will Carry Us

(Source: artificialharmonic)

addiction-baby:

so-personal:

everything personal

X

addiction-baby:

so-personal:

everything personal

X

(Source: testimonialyear)